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Old 12-31-2005, 11:25 AM   #1 (permalink)
Al Talib
 
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Belief Net.org

I would like to include something I have found useful/interesting to understanding myself and life's journey.

This quiz compares our choices with other world religions and philosophical approaches, showing how they over lap, but not with the intention of telling us what we 'are'.

So have fun and take this on a let's compare on a normalize scale if nothing else.

Enjoy and Discuss.

Site:www.beliefnet.com
Quiz: Belief-o-matic

Love,
SageTree
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Old 11-23-2006, 03:22 PM   #2 (permalink)
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nice link
Unitarian Universalism (100%)
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Old 02-15-2008, 05:59 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Mahayana Buddhists

Beliefnet Presents a Comprehensive Look in to Mahayana Buddhism: Beliefs and Practices -- Beliefnet.com
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Old 11-05-2008, 11:37 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I took the test as I do every so often and I came up 100% Mahayana Buddhist, thats a new one for me, usually Unitarian and Pagan is follow closely by liberal quaker, and Hindu. This time Hindu switched with Quaker, but stayed mostly the same otherwise.
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Old 11-05-2008, 12:15 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I received 100% for Secular Humanism. lol well that's certainly a new term.
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Old 11-05-2008, 12:17 PM   #6 (permalink)
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That never came up on my results in a place that I could read easily. Unitarian, the church I've attened for a while now, embraces humanism, even secularly so. The action is more important than the belief that gets you there is my impression, however we are all there to learn from each others experiance. I'm not secular personally so I can see why it'd be near the bottom, although I too feel the core of what matter doesn't need spirit to work persay. Faith in humanity is enough faith to me. Everything else is personal. Thanks for a new perspective.
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Old 03-08-2009, 01:42 AM   #7 (permalink)
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My latest one:

1. Mahayana Buddhism (100%)
2. Unitarian Universalism (99%)
3. Hinduism (98%)
4. Neo-Pagan (97%)
5. Liberal Quakers (97%)
6. New Age (96%)
7. Theravada Buddhism (86%)
8. New Thought (81%)
9. Jainism (74%)
10. Taoism (74%)
11. Scientology (73%)
12. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (72%)
13. Reform Judaism (69%)
14. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (64%)
15. Secular Humanism (62%)
16. Sikhism (61%)
17. Baha'i Faith (58%)
18. Orthodox Quaker (53%)
19. Orthodox Judaism (35%)
20. Nontheist (26%)
21. Islam (26%)
22. Seventh Day Adventist (21%)
23. Jehovah's Witness (20%)
24. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (17%)
25. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (17%)
26. Eastern Orthodox (13%)
27. Roman Catholic (13%)
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Old 03-08-2009, 05:00 PM   #8 (permalink)
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for sake of space i only put the top 6..

1. Neo-Pagan (100%)
2. Unitarian Universalism (84%)
3. New Age (83%)
4. Hinduism (80%)
5. Jainism (80%)
6. Mahayana Buddhism (78%)

i dont know if anyone else here has hit this problem.. but i cant put a name to what i believe. Its traditional native american medicine pulled from my home tribe and the 'ancient ones' (for me, the Inca). i have to look more into what neo-pagan is.


Sage, maybe you can help me with this one? (what is neo-pagan?)
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Old 03-09-2009, 10:02 AM   #9 (permalink)
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A neo pagan, is basically an old pagan in my mind. Pagan to me is a word that means alot of things. Basically religion of the earth and all the things around it, is paganism. Tribes in Ireland, before St. Patrick, drove out the "serpents", Desert tribes of Arabia, Normadic people of the Asia, Native North and South Americans and any people who lived and communed with the earth and worshipped creation as it the diety. Simply stated is Paganism. There are many angles of duality in god/goddess, single source, greek pantheons,ect, but at its core is spirituality of the earth, and god/dess real or represtative of qualities of nature and humans.

Therefore, Neo-Pagans are really just Pagans to me. I'm sure there are Wiccans who, I consider Pagans, would tell me why it's so different and new, but I think the only thing that is new is the rituals, since there aren't alot of recorded data from pagan era before the onset of monotheism.

If you go to that web site the will give you their view of what it is. But I think that searching it and finding out for yourself what that is would be good and in the truest vein to defining a spiritual path, with such an open deffinition culturally.

I feel strongly that Nature is a divine teacher to me. It's where I place myself or what I notice on my walks that show me peace and tranquility, of a thing living true to the call of the Universe, as we can to a part of Nature herself.

But don't just listen to me. Try looking for yourself, and that is the true path of spirituality to me. Knowing you know and not just accepting what your told, make it true or false to your understanding and walk humbly in your conclusions, staying open to new ways of learning.

For me personally, I attened a Unitarian Church for many years, and Buddhism is what lead me and gave me hope when I first looked outside of Christianity for reason. My wife showed me Pagan understanding and Hinduism is what tied all religions Light onto one path for me. I feel that my resaults are pretty correct. I feel connected to the ways of Islam as well, but I guess that I'm not orthodox enough for the test to align me there. Liberal Quakers have alot in common with Unitarian Universalist on a the spiritual side. Spiritual UU's I would say are mystics in the regaurd that they listen to what Life has to teach them and make conclusions based on their own findings to what they percieve as Light/Truth

Loving Kindness,
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Old 03-09-2009, 02:48 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I feel strongly that Nature is a divine teacher to me. It's where I place myself or what I notice on my walks that show me peace and tranquility, of a thing living true to the call of the Universe, as we can to a part of Nature herself.

But don't just listen to me. Try looking for yourself, and that is the true path of spirituality to me. Knowing you know and not just accepting what your told, make it true or false to your understanding and walk humbly in your conclusions, staying open to new ways of learning.
Since I was brought up a staunch Baptist, i feel like im reaching a good deal of conflict here because of the lingering lessons taught to me younger in life. (story of Jesus, etc.)
i will definately take your advice and 'look' for this one on my own. I feel like it will (or im hoping it will) give me a lot of answers as to where the spirits may take me. thank you very much
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Old 03-09-2009, 03:51 PM   #11 (permalink)
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I'm glad that you are comfortable with the changes and are working with them. Perhaps it would be good to access the parts of your early faith and see what you agree with still, and then branch from there?

My door is always open to talk.

Loving Kindness,
SageTree
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Old 03-09-2009, 06:08 PM   #12 (permalink)
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i did just that today Sage. And i have found that i dont agree with most of what is delivered as a 'truth'. it reminds me in several ways of the control that the catholic church posesses. i almost dont know how to react to what i saw...i definatly remember being taught the lessons and values, but i think i was too yong to totally understand it. and now that i have had a chance to grow, ive learned that its just so anti-me that i really dont know that i could stay with it even if i had to.

and knowing that i have various other things that have shaped me, i guess im not sure where to take this one. I have gotten myself pretty deep into my native medicine.. (good and bad.. with the ugly to come) do you reccomend i try to make the baptist way part of my life? even just as a point of knowledge i can keep with me?
I know the ultimately its my choise, but guidance seems to be key here.
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Old 03-09-2009, 08:05 PM   #13 (permalink)
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I don't know if I would say baptist way. Maybe you could just keep it at the level of Christianity if you want to revisit your early years.

Once I went to hear a monk speak about Buddhism, which I mentioned was my major achoring point. He said somethng that changed the next 7 years of my life. He told a story about a man that went to India to meet a Master and live in a monastary ect.... The master said to him

"For him to grasp his new commitment that he must first understand the faith that was his first spiritual language."

This really was astounding and kind of upset me. What is next is a REALLY long story and alot of reading many many books.

The first one that I picked up was 'Living Buddha, Living Christ' by Thich Nhat Hanh: Amazon.com: Living Buddha, Living Christ 10th Anniversary Edition: Thich Nhat Hanh, Elaine Pagels: Books

I felt this book was a good place to start because Jesus in the Gospels is all that really mattered to me about my faith growing up. And Buddha was a person I felt drawn to, as well as seeming to exhibit a manner which i felt was very close to the Jesus I knew. The book was very helpful and had some good quotes. One major one was that the more we understand other reason for religion/path, the more we are bound to understand our own. Which made me think about when did I feel good about being spiritual in my life, and when did that happen in the Methodist Church? Viewing myself as a child living the precepts I felt close to. These two things sent me on a quest to learn about as many relgions and ideas/philosophies ect, that I could lay my hands on, in the thought that this will help me learn to read things i agree with about these books as well. Which was very true and I feel that I can express My inclinations in people's spiritual understanding and making a better conversation over all I believe. After a really long time I finally was reading the fictional work 'The Last Temptation of Christ' and this got be thinking so large in metaphore that when I had finished the book, around easter, I got up and did a reading of walking out of the tomb in the morning of the resurection. Now I by no means still had any idea how to make sense of that part of christianity. However I honoured a part of Sunday Church that I genuinly love, which was the Sun rise service on Easter Morning. Around that same time I picked up a book that talked about the writings about Jesus and their perennial realation to Hindu Philosophy, which I find great understanding and Union of mind. One of the things he talked about was Jesus being one more master to show that mind can overcome bodily death. Simply stated I had found a means of understanding that finally fit my personal beliefs.

And also simply stated I'm saying maybe find a book that relates your understanding of goodness, to a biblical perspective. Another thought is that you might just enjoy reading something like the book I read or a writing by Depak Chopra on Jesus. Both of these people write for western understandings and it will just give a somethng to see in writing that might be how you feel about spirituality in general and seeing it realated in a new way to you. These guys both have a very open and universal way of explaining, and their ideas sound like they might make sense or jive with somethings that you feel.

Remember if anything made you feel good about your youth. Any time you felt happy about church even if it wasn't about church, just AT church. Maybe a ceremony you liked. Or a verse that always made sense. or song anything. And just think about it. What are the larger good things in it? What things drive people to work FOR a church, and you will get to that larger place. I don't believe in my heart of hearts that people are really there to fuck up people lives, and that they see some goodness in what they are doing.

Second, Find an outside perspective of christianity in any form, or something about what people think god is. 'What the bleep do we know' while has some controversy surounding it is interesting to hear a liniar picture for a while. Just consider, because i think you know, there are bigger ways of looking at spirituality, so apply that large understanding to that little book.

Personally the Gospels are THE universal part of the Book, the first part is mostly history with some good large metaphores in, like Exodus and "aren't we all in motion looking for promised land." Genesis 'Don't we all want to know where we came from" The Judges "This is why we made the laws" Psalms and Solomon/Ecclessiastis " Good stuff, read large" The Prophets " Larger social justice stuff here" And then everything after the gospel " This is the radical and weird ways we messed up everyhing Jesus taught and Revalation " This is some fucked up stuff to scare people and make them suspicious, unless they can read the metaphore in a huge way here. Which leaves us with the Gospel. That's what I'd read and get comfortable with, if you want to re-relate.

I can't tell you what to do though and expect you will, so these are just my recommendations and sight tangent

Basically I found the love/social code in the Gospel, that Breaths the same Breath that I find and feel in alot of other texts. The Bible/Gospels aren't my main source by anymeans, however I still feel that I can read goodness from it, and is part of my reading meditations. The Bhagavad Gita is my main source of inspiration on Living as well as the Upanishads and Buddha's teachings. But finally this last October after reading some of Paramahansa Yogananada's writtings on the Gospel's I finally was past a large mile marker in my realationship with Jesus.

Hope these words helped. Sometimes it better if I just tell my story, instead of preaching to you



SageTree
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:16 AM   #14 (permalink)
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i know i did this survey before but it was a while ago and i forget what i got exactly. just took it again:

1. Unitarian Universalism (100%)
2. Liberal Quakers (89%)
3. Neo-Pagan (79%)
4. Mahayana Buddhism (76%)
5. New Age (75%)
6. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (72%)
7. Taoism (68%)
8. Theravada Buddhism (68%)
9. New Thought (66%)
10. Secular Humanism (66%)
11. Scientology (59%)
12. Reform Judaism (56%)
13. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (50%)
14. Hinduism (50%)
15. Jainism (46%)
16. Sikhism (45%)
17. Orthodox Quaker (43%)
18. Nontheist (38%)
19. Baha'i Faith (37%)
20. Orthodox Judaism (22%)
21. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (21%)
22. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (17%)
23. Seventh Day Adventist (17%)
24. Islam (15%)
25. Jehovah's Witness (12%)
26. Eastern Orthodox (12%)
27. Roman Catholic (12%)
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:21 AM   #15 (permalink)
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It's not science here, but it's fun to compare our results, see where we overlap on a set scale rating.
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Old 06-28-2009, 11:45 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SageTree View Post
My latest one:

1. Mahayana Buddhism (100%)
2. Unitarian Universalism (99%)
3. Hinduism (98%)
4. Neo-Pagan (97%)
5. Liberal Quakers (97%)
6. New Age (96%)
7. Theravada Buddhism (86%)
8. New Thought (81%)
9. Jainism (74%)
10. Taoism (74%)
1. Unitarian Universalism (100%)
2. Theravada Buddhism (94%)
3. Mahayana Buddhism (90%)
4. Liberal Quakers (83%)
5. Neo-Pagan (79%)
6. New Age (75%)
7. Secular Humanism (72%)
8. Taoism (69%)
9. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (68%)
10. Jainism (66%)
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Old 07-16-2009, 06:47 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Good info has been made this post. It is really interesting and useful.
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Old 07-16-2009, 10:26 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Interesting....

My results. I just answered the ?'s, but left ? rank as medium. I did not rank any importance.

1. Unitarian Universalism (100%)
2. Neo-Pagan (88%)
3. Liberal Quakers (84%)
4. Mahayana Buddhism (80%)
5. New Age (79%)
6. Theravada Buddhism (79%)
7. Secular Humanism (75%)
8. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (67%)
9. Taoism (66%)
10. Sikhism (62%)
11. Hinduism (59%)
12. Scientology (54%)
13. Jainism (54%)
14. New Thought (50%)
15. Reform Judaism (47%)
16. Nontheist (45%)
17. Orthodox Quaker (45%)
18. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (39%)
19. Baha'i Faith (38%)
20. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (25%)
21. Orthodox Judaism (23%)
22. Seventh Day Adventist (20%)
23. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (19%)
24. Eastern Orthodox (16%)
25. Islam (16%)
26. Roman Catholic (16%)
27. Jehovah's Witness (12%)

I have some personal research to consider now, Sage.

Gratzi.
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Old 07-16-2009, 05:54 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Glad to hear you had a good experience and look forward to hearing about your looking.

Going with all medium is a good neutral way to go, although there were a few like the enviroment and social programmes I did mark as high. I retake it so often and mess around with them according to late developements, because we all change and evolve over time on certain things.

Glad you took the time to look at it.

Metta
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Old 10-24-2009, 01:18 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SageTree View Post

1. Mahayana Buddhism (100%)
2. Unitarian Universalism (99%)
3. Hinduism (98%)
4. Neo-Pagan (97%)
5. Liberal Quakers (97%)
6. New Age (96%)
7. Theravada Buddhism (86%)
8. New Thought (81%)
9. Jainism (74%)
10. Taoism (74%)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SageTree View Post
1. Unitarian Universalism (100%)
2. Theravada Buddhism (94%)
3. Mahayana Buddhism (90%)
4. Liberal Quakers (83%)
5. Neo-Pagan (79%)
6. New Age (75%)
7. Secular Humanism (72%)
8. Taoism (69%)
9. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (68%)
10. Jainism (66%)
1. Mahayana Buddhism (100%)
2. Theravada Buddhism (94%)
3. Unitarian Universalism (93%)
4. Neo-Pagan (92%)
5. Liberal Quakers (90%)
6. New Age (87%)
7. Taoism (80%)
8. Jainism (77%)
9. Hinduism (72%)
10. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (71%)
11. New Thought (67%)
12. Orthodox Quaker (65%)
13. Secular Humanism (65%)
14. Scientology (63%)
15. Reform Judaism (62%)
16. Sikhism (57%)
17. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (55%)
18. Baha'i Faith (53%)
19. Orthodox Judaism (38%)
20. Nontheist (35%)
21. Seventh Day Adventist (33%)
22. Islam (28%)
23. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (28%)
24. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (28%)
25. Jehovah's Witness (18%)
26. Eastern Orthodox (17%)
27. Roman Catholic (17%)
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