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-   -   More african americans in prison than were slaves in 1850 (http://www.yahooka.com/politics-current-affairs/168013-more-african-americans-prison-than-were-slaves-1850-a.html)

fenderbender 08-24-2013 11:43 PM

More african americans in prison than were slaves in 1850
 
...

i understand that there has been an increase in population... but still....


and obama is going to be giving a speech this week in honor of the "i have a dream speech" by MLK.

...

Dr. King would be ashamed of the current administration and actively speak out against it.
King was assassinated because of his anti war protesting. What he would say about or actions in the world today...



too much bullshit..

:cuss:

Jewish Pork 08-25-2013 01:44 AM

Almost all of that is due to our drug policy.[/thread]

stoneric 08-25-2013 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fenderbender (Post 52198329)
...

i understand that there has been an increase in population... but still....


and obama is going to be giving a speech this week in honor of the "i have a dream speech" by MLK.

...

Dr. King would be ashamed of the current administration and actively speak out against it.
King was assassinated because of his anti war protesting. What he would say about or actions in the world today...



too much bullshit..

:cuss:

Yeah, obomba is the ultimate hypocrite. He would have droned MLK.

Geeno 08-25-2013 07:31 AM

Also they're called black people.

The Rev 08-25-2013 10:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Geeno (Post 52198341)
Also they're called black people.

http://t.qkme.me/3rlz5a.jpg

:bigjoint:

The Rev

Grieves 08-25-2013 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stoneric (Post 52198340)
Yeah, obomba is the ultimate hypocrite. He would have droned MLK.

It's okay cause MLK was a violent wife beater, and adulterer. NSA would have known and put a stop to that.

Waves 08-25-2013 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jewish Pork (Post 52198337)
Almost all of that is due to our drug policy.[/thread]

so you think that if drugs were decriminalized all of a sudden the numbers would average out?

you dont think poor people tend to commit more crimes and black people tend to be poor, so therefore a = b, b = c, a = c?

im pretty sure the justice system is also racist as fuck and would be racist as fuck no matter what our drug policy is.

distilling down complicated social factors to just one influencing element seems simplistic and naive to me.

stoneric 08-25-2013 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Waves (Post 52198373)
so you think that if drugs were decriminalized all of a sudden the numbers would average out?

you dont think poor people tend to commit more crimes and black people tend to be poor, so therefore a = b, b = c, a = c?

im pretty sure the justice system is also racist as fuck and would be racist as fuck no matter what our drug policy is.

distilling down complicated social factors to just one influencing element seems simplistic and naive to me.

The sheer numbers would be dramatically different because of the lopsided % being incarcerated for drug offenses. Not saying that makes our justice system less racist mind you.

DdC 08-26-2013 02:47 AM

More Koch Profits & Income Tax back renting cages, than from minimum wages...
 
Racism is a tool of fascism or corporatism.
Wall St runs the Ganjawar.
Hemp is the reason Ganja is dangerous.

A Displaced and Discarded Labor Force

NeoConflicts of Interest
MJ Research Cut as Support Grows
Court Odor'd Rehabilitation Asylums, Pisstasting Growth Industries.
Bush Barthwell & Drugs
DEAth Legalizing cannabinoids & Sublingual Sprays
Dispensaries, Farms and Hemp Kempt Outlawed...

To Stay Out of Jail, Must Nonviolent Offenders Submit to Medical Diagnoses?
Atlantic by Jeff Deeney

http://i44.tinypic.com/dngjsm.jpg

It isn’t just in the U.S. dwr

Racial disparity is a fact of drug prohibition.

Release (UK) has released a new report: The Numbers in Black and White: Ethnic Disparities in the Policing and Prosecution of Drug Offenses in England and Wales
The Numbers in Black And White: Ethnic Disparities In The Policing And Prosecution Of Drug Offences In England And Wales | Release
Here’s just a taste of their findings:

Quote:

Every 58 seconds someone is stopped and searched for drugs in England and Wales. [...] Just over 7600 were of children aged 15 or below. [...]

For those from the white population it was 7 per 1000, increasing to 14 per 1000 for those identifying as mixed race, 18 per 1000 for those identifying as Asian and to 45 per 1000 for those identifying as black.

Black people were, in other words, 6.3 times more likely to be stopped and searched for drugs than white people, while Asian people were 2.5 times more likely to be stopped and searched for drugs and those identifying as mixed race were stopped and searched for drugs at twice the rate of white people. [...]

Across London black people are charged for possession of cannabis at 5 times the rate of white people. [...]

Black people in London who are caught in possession of cocaine are charged, rather than cautioned, at a much higher rate than their white counterparts. In 2009/10 the Metropolitan Police charged 78 per cent of black people caught in possession of cocaine compared with 44 per cent of whites.
Again, it doesn’t even have to mean that those who write or enforce the laws are racially motivated (though some may be). Even if the people are not racist at all, a drug war is by its very nature flawed and cannot help but be enforced in a way that is racist in its results. This is a result of the challenges of enforcing laws against a popular consensual crime and societal factors of community and poverty.
~ Pete Guither dwr

http://i39.tinypic.com/fcmma9.jpg

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and MMJ Prohibition
Writing from a Birmingham jail in 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., explained the four steps of civil disobedience. First, research must reveal an injustice. If the facts show that a law is unjust, then the next step is to negotiate a remedy with those in a position to fix the problem. If after good faith negotiation the people in power refuse to repair the damage they caused, then the next step is self-purification. Unclean hands should not accuse other hands of being too dirty. The final step of civil disobedience is to actually disobey a civil law.

One Drug Arrest Every 19 Seconds... Oh Gilligan!

Thank you Miss Rosa
The Racist Ganjawar
Re-Inventing Jim Crow
keep blacks from voting

http://i41.tinypic.com/2qd9wrc.jpg

Kochroach & Aleech
Today many have had their eyes opened regarding the huge profits made off of what is commonly called the "Prison Industrial Complex." Suddenly awareness has turned from disbelief to anger as taxpayers realize the screwing private prison companies, their lobbyists and elected Legislators have been giving them for more than three decades now.

In Prison Reform, Money Trumps Civil Rights
THE legal scholar Derrick A. Bell foresaw that mass incarceration, like earlier systems of racial control, would continue to exist as long as it served the perceived interests of white elites.

"Ye shall know the truth,
And the truth shall make you angry."
~ Aldous Huxley

Ganjawar: Slave Labor, Rape & Pillage Deterrent
At the same time, the United States blasts China for the use of prison slave labor, engaging in the same practice itself. Prison labor is a pot of gold. No strikes, union organizing, health benefits, unemployment insurance or workers' compensation to pay.

Slave Labor Means Big Bucks For U.S. Corporations
As if exploiting the labor of prison inmates was not bad enough, it is legal in the United States to use slave labor. The 13th Amendment of the Constitution states that "neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted shall exist within the United States."

http://i35.tinypic.com/2ue1mye.gif

Xil 08-26-2013 01:00 PM

In the US in 2011 there were about 2.2-2.3 million prisoners, with around 4.8 million people on parole or probation.

That means if we took all the prisoners in the US and created a 'prisoner state' it would be the 36th largest state. If we included people not incarcerated but still under the thumb of the penal system it would be the 13th largest state with more citizens than Washington state.


WHAT IN THE EVERLOVING FUCK IS WRONG WITH US?!

Waves 08-26-2013 01:38 PM

now check out the numbers on the private prison industry. all those people need to be cared for, they need sheets, clothes, food, etc. then they take those prisoners and put them to work in private industries where they make tons of money for these companies. there is a ton of motivation to keep the prison economy going because it is the source of so much of our countries overall income. to the point where our economy probably could no longer function in its current state if these people were no longer allowed to work as essentially slaves for these private corporations who subcontract prisoners but dont pay them or pay them jack shit for doing work that on the outside they would get payed to do.

we have an economy built around caring and housing for such large numbers of imprisoned people. that is the input. those imprisoned people have built an economy around essential slave labor that they output. so the vicious cycle is that the economy is built around housing/caring for such large numbers of people and without the huge numbers of people that economy would fail, and then the output which is the essential slave labor of prisoners would then fail which would cause the industries that they are slaving for to fail. all those things are one big cycle of bullshit that keeps increasing and increasing and we keep building more prisons and we keep putting more prisoners to work and the economic cycle becomes more and more a vital part of our national economy, creating a prison industrial complex.

the entire thing is this unhealthy bundle of connections where if you un-connect one thing the entire god damn mess falls apart. and that bundle of connections is tangled up to the bundle of connections that is our national economy. and THAT whole thing is only ONE industrial complex we have of many right now, including the fun little military industrial complex where war and the economy around war and defense has become essential to the prosper of our economy. or the medical industrial complex that is currently getting worse and worse. or the auto and other industry where we are forced to pay huge bailouts to keep the charade going. our economy is just becoming poisoned at every turn. there is no good news and none coming down the pipeline.

MURICA!

Waves 08-26-2013 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stoneric (Post 52198375)
The sheer numbers would be dramatically different because of the lopsided % being incarcerated for drug offenses. Not saying that makes our justice system less racist mind you.

how much different though? would black people still outnumber everyone else?

my point is that i believe they would, due to social/socioeconomic factors at play here in this fine country of ours.

black people would still commit more crimes on average than other races, and the racist justice system would still put them away in larger numbers and for lesser offenses than other races. if we think the fucked up drug policy is the only thing influencing such large numbers of black in prison i think the problem and the root of the problem is far far deeper than just that.

Grieves 08-26-2013 01:47 PM

Quote:

The median net worth of a white household today is $91,405, while the wealth figure for black households is $6,446.
sauce

http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files...B_widened1.png

Xil 08-26-2013 01:48 PM

Private prisons (especially with slave labor) make the owners very wealthy, and they tend to buy a lot of influence with politicians, but I'm a little skeptical to the claim that it's essential for our economy to function. I'm sure it would take a hit, but one we'd come back from.

I'm no economist though

Waves 08-26-2013 01:48 PM

if i was black i would be dealing drugs, no question.

Waves 08-26-2013 01:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Xil (Post 52198426)
Private prisons (especially with slave labor) make the owners very wealthy, and they tend to buy a lot of influence with politicians, but I'm a little skeptical to the claim that it's essential for our economy to function. I'm sure it would take a hit, but one we'd come back from.

I'm no economist though

Well im not going to say that for a fact. thats just the feeling i get after doing enough research to do a 15 page paper on this subject in college.

The private prison industry generates 1.7 billion a year. Thats about the same as the healthcare industry which generates 1.6 billion a year. So prisoners generate more revenue than doctors do for our country, thats pretty mind blowing.

Xil 08-26-2013 01:58 PM

Thanks for lending some perspective. I knew the ~1.7 figure but I didn't have a good frame of reference. I was thinking as a percentage of GDP (real small) instead of trying to find a comparable industry.


Now if they'd just fund hospitals like they do prisons...





...



we'd still have the same massive overcrowding and fuckery. without cutting back on the overcrowding any rehab is a joke. and instead of letting people use there time productively (ie, getting a college degree) we got rid of those programs in favor of being a bunch of vengeful pricks. Seriously, fuck whoever supported dismantling those programs, and fuck everyone who supported mandatory minimums back in the 70s/80s or whatever. It's statute now that prisons should be ineffective and overfilled..

:mad:

ProfessorMurder 08-29-2013 11:15 PM

and now for no reason...

Black Sheep!

<iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/K9F5xcpjDMU?feature= player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

fenderbender 08-30-2013 12:49 AM

what does this prison slave labor produce?


like, where/how are these prisoners being put to work to generate such profit?

Grieves 08-30-2013 02:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fenderbender (Post 52198446)
what does this prison slave labor produce?


like, where/how are these prisoners being put to work to generate such profit?

Quote:

Human rights organizations, as well as political and social ones, are condemning what they are calling a new form of inhumane exploitation in the United States, where they say a prison population of up to 2 million – mostly Black and Hispanic – are working for various industries for a pittance. For the tycoons who have invested in the prison industry, it has been like finding a pot of gold. They don’t have to worry about strikes or paying unemployment insurance, vacations or comp time. All of their workers are full-time, and never arrive late or are absent because of family problems; moreover, if they don’t like the pay of 25 cents an hour and refuse to work, they are locked up in isolation cells.

There are approximately 2 million inmates in state, federal and private prisons throughout the country. According to California Prison Focus, “no other society in human history has imprisoned so many of its own citizens.” The figures show that the United States has locked up more people than any other country: a half million more than China, which has a population five times greater than the U.S. Statistics reveal that the United States holds 25% of the world’s prison population, but only 5% of the world’s people. From less than 300,000 inmates in 1972, the jail population grew to 2 million by the year 2000. In 1990 it was one million. Ten years ago there were only five private prisons in the country, with a population of 2,000 inmates; now, there are 100, with 62,000 inmates. It is expected that by the coming decade, the number will hit 360,000, according to reports.

What has happened over the last 10 years? Why are there so many prisoners?

“The private contracting of prisoners for work fosters incentives to lock people up. Prisons depend on this income. Corporate stockholders who make money off prisoners’ work lobby for longer sentences, in order to expand their workforce. The system feeds itself,” says a study by the Progressive Labor Party, which accuses the prison industry of being “an imitation of Nazi Germany with respect to forced slave labor and concentration camps.”

The prison industry complex is one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States and its investors are on Wall Street. “This multimillion-dollar industry has its own trade exhibitions, conventions, websites, and mail-order/Internet catalogs. It also has direct advertising campaigns, architecture companies, construction companies, investment houses on Wall Street, plumbing supply companies, food supply companies, armed security, and padded cells in a large variety of colors.”

According to the Left Business Observer, the federal prison industry produces 100% of all military helmets, ammunition belts, bullet-proof vests, ID tags, shirts, pants, tents, bags, and canteens. Along with war supplies, prison workers supply 98% of the entire market for equipment assembly services; 93% of paints and paintbrushes; 92% of stove assembly; 46% of body armor; 36% of home appliances; 30% of headphones/microphones/speakers; and 21% of office furniture. Airplane parts, medical supplies, and much more: prisoners are even raising seeing-eye dogs for blind people.

CRIME GOES DOWN, JAIL POPULATION GOES UP

According to reports by human rights organizations, these are the factors that increase the profit potential for those who invest in the prison industry complex:

. Jailing persons convicted of non-violent crimes, and long prison sentences for possession of microscopic quantities of illegal drugs. Federal law stipulates five years’ imprisonment without possibility of parole for possession of 5 grams of crack or 3.5 ounces of heroin, and 10 years for possession of less than 2 ounces of rock-cocaine or crack. A sentence of 5 years for cocaine powder requires possession of 500 grams – 100 times more than the quantity of rock cocaine for the same sentence. Most of those who use cocaine powder are white, middle-class or rich people, while mostly Blacks and Latinos use rock cocaine. In Texas, a person may be sentenced for up to two years’ imprisonment for possessing 4 ounces of marijuana. Here in New York, the 1973 Nelson Rockefeller anti-drug law provides for a mandatory prison sentence of 15 years to life for possession of 4 ounces of any illegal drug.

. The passage in 13 states of the “three strikes” laws (life in prison after being convicted of three felonies), made it necessary to build 20 new federal prisons. One of the most disturbing cases resulting from this measure was that of a prisoner who for stealing a car and two bicycles received three 25-year sentences.

. Longer sentences.

. The passage of laws that require minimum sentencing, without regard for circumstances.

. A large expansion of work by prisoners creating profits that motivate the incarceration of more people for longer periods of time.

. More punishment of prisoners, so as to lengthen their sentences.

HISTORY OF PRISON LABOR IN THE UNITED STATES

Prison labor has its roots in slavery. After the 1861-1865 Civil War, a system of “hiring out prisoners” was introduced in order to continue the slavery tradition. Freed slaves were charged with not carrying out their sharecropping commitments (cultivating someone else’s land in exchange for part of the harvest) or petty thievery – which were almost never proven – and were then “hired out” for cotton picking, working in mines and building railroads. From 1870 until 1910 in the state of Georgia, 88% of hired-out convicts were Black. In Alabama, 93% of “hired-out” miners were Black. In Mississippi, a huge prison farm similar to the old slave plantations replaced the system of hiring out convicts. The notorious Parchman plantation existed until 1972.

During the post-Civil War period, Jim Crow racial segregation laws were imposed on every state, with legal segregation in schools, housing, marriages and many other aspects of daily life. “Today, a new set of markedly racist laws is imposing slave labor and sweatshops on the criminal justice system, now known as the prison industry complex,” comments the Left Business Observer.

Who is investing? At least 37 states have legalized the contracting of prison labor by private corporations that mount their operations inside state prisons. The list of such companies contains the cream of U.S. corporate society: IBM, Boeing, Motorola, Microsoft, AT&T, Wireless, Texas Instrument, Dell, Compaq, Honeywell, Hewlett-Packard, Nortel, Lucent Technologies, 3Com, Intel, Northern Telecom, TWA, Nordstrom’s, Revlon, Macy’s, Pierre Cardin, Target Stores, and many more. All of these businesses are excited about the economic boom generation by prison labor. Just between 1980 and 1994, profits went up from $392 million to $1.31 billion. Inmates in state penitentiaries generally receive the minimum wage for their work, but not all; in Colorado, they get about $2 per hour, well under the minimum. And in privately-run prisons, they receive as little as 17 cents per hour for a maximum of six hours a day, the equivalent of $20 per month. The highest-paying private prison is CCA in Tennessee, where prisoners receive 50 cents per hour for what they call “highly skilled positions.” At those rates, it is no surprise that inmates find the pay in federal prisons to be very generous. There, they can earn $1.25 an hour and work eight hours a day, and sometimes overtime. They can send home $200-$300 per month.

Thanks to prison labor, the United States is once again an attractive location for investment in work that was designed for Third World labor markets. A company that operated a maquiladora (assembly plant in Mexico near the border) closed down its operations there and relocated to San Quentin State Prison in California. In Texas, a factory fired its 150 workers and contracted the services of prisoner-workers from the private Lockhart Texas prison, where circuit boards are assembled for companies like IBM and Compaq.

[Former] Oregon State Representative Kevin Mannix recently urged Nike to cut its production in Indonesia and bring it to his state, telling the shoe manufacturer that “there won’t be any transportation costs; we’re offering you competitive prison labor (here).”

PRIVATE PRISONS

The prison privatization boom began in the 1980s, under the governments of Ronald Reagan and Bush Sr., but reached its height in 1990 under William Clinton, when Wall Street stocks were selling like hotcakes. Clinton’s program for cutting the federal workforce resulted in the Justice Departments contracting of private prison corporations for the incarceration of undocumented workers and high-security inmates.

Private prisons are the biggest business in the prison industry complex. About 18 corporations guard 10,000 prisoners in 27 states. The two largest are Correctional Corporation of America (CCA) and Wackenhut, which together control 75%. Private prisons receive a guaranteed amount of money for each prisoner, independent of what it costs to maintain each one. According to Russell Boraas, a private prison administrator in Virginia, “the secret to low operating costs is having a minimal number of guards for the maximum number of prisoners.” The CCA has an ultra-modern prison in Lawrenceville, Virginia, where five guards on dayshift and two at night watch over 750 prisoners. In these prisons, inmates may get their sentences reduced for “good behavior,” but for any infraction, they get 30 days added – which means more profits for CCA. According to a study of New Mexico prisons, it was found that CCA inmates lost “good behavior time” at a rate eight times higher than those in state prisons.

IMPORTING AND EXPORTING INMATES

Profits are so good that now there is a new business: importing inmates with long sentences, meaning the worst criminals. When a federal judge ruled that overcrowding in Texas prisons was cruel and unusual punishment, the CCA signed contracts with sheriffs in poor counties to build and run new jails and share the profits. According to a December 1998 Atlantic Monthly magazine article, this program was backed by investors from Merrill-Lynch, Shearson-Lehman, American Express and Allstate, and the operation was scattered all over rural Texas. That state’s governor, Ann Richards, followed the example of Mario Cuomo in New York and built so many state prisons that the market became flooded, cutting into private prison profits.

After a law signed by Clinton in 1996 – ending court supervision and decisions – caused overcrowding and violent, unsafe conditions in federal prisons, private prison corporations in Texas began to contact other states whose prisons were overcrowded, offering “rent-a-cell” services in the CCA prisons located in small towns in Texas. The commission for a rent-a-cell salesman is $2.50 to $5.50 per day per bed. The county gets $1.50 for each prisoner.

STATISTICS

Ninety-seven percent of 125,000 federal inmates have been convicted of non-violent crimes. It is believed that more than half of the 623,000 inmates in municipal or county jails are innocent of the crimes they are accused of. Of these, the majority are awaiting trial. Two-thirds of the one million state prisoners have committed non-violent offenses. Sixteen percent of the country’s 2 million prisoners suffer from mental illness.
sause


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